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All About Plantar Fasciitis

January 12, 2018

 

 

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

 

Plantar Fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. The plantar fascia is the flat band of tissue (ligament) that connects your heel bone to your toes. It supports the arch of your foot. If you strain your plantar fascia, it gets weak, swollen, and irritated (inflamed). Then your heel or the bottom of your foot hurts when you stand or walk. Plantar fasciitis is common in middle-aged people as well as younger people who are on their feet a lot, like athletes. It often can happen in one foot or both feet.

Causes

 

Plantar fasciitis is caused by straining the ligament that supports your arch. Repeated strain can cause tiny tears in the ligament. These can lead to pain and swelling. This is more likely to happen if:

  • Your feet roll inward too much when you walk   

  • You have high arches or flat feet.

  • You walk, stand, or run for long periods of time, especially on hard surfaces.

  •  You are overweight

  • You wear shoes that don't fit well or are worn out.

  • You have tight Achilles tendons or calf muscles.

Symptoms

 

Most people with Plantar Fasciitis have a multitude of symptoms such as: 

 

  • Stiffness and pain in the morning or after resting that gets better after a few steps but gets worse as the day progresses.

  • Pain that gets worse when you climb stairs or stand on your toes.

  • Pain after you stand for long periods.

  • Pain at the beginning of exercise that gets better or goes away as exercise continues but returns when exercise is completed.

At Home Therapies

 

The right kind of self treatment can help you knock out Plantar Fasciitis and get back to your everyday activities. Here are some at home remedies to get you back up and moving:

 

  • Stretch the fascia. Prop your toes up against a wall, keeping your arch and heel flat so the toes stretch. Hold for a count of 10. Repeat 10 times three or four times per day.

  • Roll a frozen water bottle under the arch. Stretch first then roll out the arch for 10 minutes; you don’t want to stretch the tendon when it’s ice cold.

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